Tag Archives: science biographies

My Favorite Science Biographies (Some of Them)

This week Charlotte Mason Institute posted an article I wrote called “Living Science Through the Lives of Scientists“. I hope you will take a few minutes to go over there and read it.

That which has become the dominant idea of one person’s life, if it be launched suddenly at another, conveys no very great depth or weight of meaning to the second person — he wants to get at it by degrees, to see the steps by which the other has traveled.” (Charlotte Mason, Home Education, p.97).

Biographies hold so much value when teaching science. I’ve seen it over and over again with my own kids. (They have been the guinea pigs for all of my science study.) It never failswe can use a rather hard biography, like Crucibles, and years later they will remember every scientific principle that was presented, while they can’t remember anything from the “list-of-facts book” two hours later. There are several reasons why I think this is the case, which I explain in my article.

In light of that article, I thought I would take a few minutes today to share some of my very favorite science biographies. Continue reading